Verbs and subjects

But why would a verb change its person and number? Why would it be first person singular in some places and third person plural in others? This is an important point and you must understand it. Here's the answer.

The verb's subject determines the verb's person and number.

  • If the subject is singular, the verb must be singular.
  • If the subject is plural, the verb must be plural.
  • If the subject is first person, the verb must be first person.
  • If the subject is second person, the verb must be second person.
  • If the subject is third person, the verb must be third person.
We do the same thing in English. Take the verb "is."
  • If the subject is "I," we switch to the form "am."
  • If the subject is "you," we say "you are."
  • If the subject is "he," we say "is."
  • If the subject is plural, we switch to "are." "We are." "You are." "They are."

This is the same thing that is happening in Greek. The verb must agree with its subject in person and number. In order to do this, the Greek verb switches its form.